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Sensory Integration Issues by Dianne Craft on 03/10/2014

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Many times a child who appears to have great difficulty with focusing and attending to a task is really struggling with a sensory processing problem. The child's sensory system is not functioning correctly, resulting in errant signals. An example of this would be a malfunctioning sensory system that shouts "pain," when a tag on a shirt touches the skin. Another example is when a child covers his ears at fairly minor unexpected sounds, because the sensory system is giving the errant signal that the sound is too loud. This child is not just distracted by their outside environment, but is distracted by their inside environment as well.

The following are some of the typical symptoms of sensory dysfunction:

Auditory:

  • The child displays sensitivity to loud noises.
  • The child struggles with language skills.
  • The child dislikes being in a group to the point of avoiding most group situations.
  • The child struggles with transitions and changes of any kind.

 

Taste/Textures:

  • The child is bothered by certain food textures, such as lumps in yogurt.
  • The child won't eat meat.
  • The child is a very selective eater, preferring mostly carbohydrates.
  • The child dislikes it when food on the same plate touches.

 

Touch:

  • The child finds clothing tags an irritant.
  • The child dislikes non-soft clothing such as jeans.
  • The child insists his socks have to have the seam "just right."
  • The child grinds his teeth.
  • The child walks on his toes for an extended period of time.
  • The child dislikes his hair being touched, combed, washed or cut.
  • The child finds visits to the doctor to be very hard.

 

About the Author

Dianne Craft has over 35 years experience teaching bright, inquisitive children who are struggling with learning disabilities. She received a Bachelor's Degree in Elementary and Special Education from St. Cloud State University in Minnesota in 1966 and a Master's Degree in Special Education from the University of Northern Colorado in 1990. Dianne lives in Centennial, Colorado with her CPA husband, Ron, and runs the private consultation practice, Child Diagnostics, Inc.

Visit Dianne Craft's Web Site

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